Newb here with a newb question...

Forum for all brewing related questions and information

Moderators: triple-oh_six, yeastmeister

Newb here with a newb question...

Postby clept » Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:33 pm

Hi guys, my names Brandon, I'm a local to the Lafayette area and I've been a purveyor and advocate of good beer for many years now. I've also loosely followed this forum for a while as well and just recently purchased my first home brew set up. Nothing fancy of course, just your standard 2 bucket kit. I figure I have plenty of time to buy individual parts should I really embrace this hobby.

My newb question is this.. The kit I purchased came with a "Muntons Gold IPA" extract kit. I'm a big IPA and DIPA fan, and I'm looking for a way to spice up this kit(like a true coonass). A few ideas I had were using a different/better yeast than what comes in the kit(US-05 or WLP001?) and dry hopping during the primary. I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to do this correctly and with ingredients that I could purchase at Marcello's. My kit comes in Friday and I plan to brew Saturday, so I don't want to wait for something off the internet this go around.

Also would it be better to dry hop during a secondary or primary? Thanks for baring with me here...
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Postby alms66 » Wed Jun 03, 2009 2:20 pm

Always dry hop in secondary.

As for "spicing" the kit up, you could always add a little extra DME, steep some crystal (almost certainly should do that), add extra hops. I don't know exactly what ingredients are in the kit, so I won't get any more specific than that. You should probably pitch in an extra pack of yeast, since you probably don't know how old the kit's yeast is.

Do you know these:
What sort of extract is in the kit?
What hops?
What kind of yeast?
alms66
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:19 pm
Location: New Iberia, LA

Postby clept » Wed Jun 03, 2009 7:42 pm

Okay, I guess I should mention that this is one of those Muntons "no-boil kits" (info about them here http://www.annapolishomebrew.com/shopNBKmuntons.asp ). Keep in mind this is just what came with my hardware.

Anyways, it says the kits come with 6.6lbs of LME... Not sure what type of Malt or Hops are boiled into the extract and searching the internet hasn't yielded much info.

However, I did go to Marcellos earlier and purchased 2 packets of US-05 yeast and 1oz of Simcoe and 1oz of Cascade. What would you suggest I do to yield the best result? I don't intend on using the Muntons yeast that comes with the kit

Forgive all these newbs questions, I'm just trying to get a good idea for the best way to approach this and my homebrew book is in the box with my equipment still in the hands of UPS.
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Postby alms66 » Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:32 am

Well, without knowing exactly what's in the kit, it's kind of hard to adjust the recipe. I looked and couldn't find any info on what hops are in the kit either. I did run 6.6 lbs of extract (I assumed light) through one of the free recipe calculators on the web (don't have beersmith handy), and it won't even reach the low end of the IPA scale, in terms of OG. Therefore, my first recomendation would be to pick up another can of LME or a bag of DME to push the OG up. Three cans of LME should get you about 1.063 or so, according to this free calculator, which is about the middle of the scale for IPA's.

Next is hopping. I don't know your AA%'s, so I used 12% for Simcoe and 6% for Cascade. In a 3 gallon boil (also don't know how much you're going to boil here, just guessing), dumping both of those in for 60 minutes will get you about 26 IBU's, and you want to be around 50, given an OG of 1.063. Not knowing what hops you're getting with the kit, makes doing adjustments here very difficult.

As for yeast, you're good with what you've got.

Now, what I'd recommend you do is use one of these free calculators to plug in all the numbers when your kit arrives so that you can plug in exactly what you have (or download the free trial of beersmith or promash and use that, if you prefer). I used this: http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipator for the numbers above. I'm sure it's not the best free one on the web, but it's fairly simple to use. Once you know what you have and plug it into a calculator, it's just a matter of adjusting the numbers to be where you want them to be.

If you need help using the calculator you choose, whatever it may be, just post and someone will be able to help you.
alms66
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:19 pm
Location: New Iberia, LA

Postby thebuddrik » Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:50 am

clept wrote:Forgive all these newbs questions


Dude, dont worry about questions. That is what this forum is here for. :D
User avatar
thebuddrik
 
Posts: 391
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2008 8:36 pm
Location: Lafayette, La.

Postby clept » Thu Jun 04, 2009 11:08 am

alms,

Thanks for your post, It helps a lot. I actually have a copy of beersmith and wasn't too sure how to use it properly til you started explaining it..

I think I've got a plan for this first batch. I'm gonna wait and see how much LME is included in the kit when it gets here, and probably add 2-3 more lbs of pale LME. I'm also gonna add the Simcoe to the "boil" for 45-60 minutes depending on what the kit tells me about the hops already boiled into the extract. I'm probably just gonna dry hop the cascade after primary for a week or 2. I've been trying to do my homework, and being the beer snob I am, I know I wouldn't be happy with a subpar batch of IPA.

Using beersmith I was able to calculate that by adding 2-3 lbs of LME, I should be between 6-7 abv and with my hop additions I should be above 60 IBU's. Which sounds pretty good to me..
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Postby alms66 » Thu Jun 04, 2009 2:16 pm

budrockdiesel wrote:
clept wrote:Forgive all these newbs questions


Dude, dont worry about questions. That is what this forum is here for. :D

I'll second that...
and no problem clept, let us know if you need anything else. Good luck with the brew.
alms66
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:19 pm
Location: New Iberia, LA

Postby aleguy » Thu Jun 04, 2009 3:41 pm

As the "official" club hophead, I feel the need to weigh in here. First off. Save your Simcoe for a 15 minute (Before the end of boil) addition. use your Cascades for dry hopping in the secondary. (2 oz. would be better) and pick up an oz. of Chinook for your 60 minute addition. (Never boil bittering hops for less than an hour.)
This should give you a very drinkable IPA in a few weeks. And yes, add another can of LME or 3lb bag of extra light DME. Try to do a full wort boil if you can. You must have or know someone who has a 7 1/2 gallon stainless turkey fryer pot you can use.
You could always ask a more experienced brewer to come and bring any equipment you don't have. Just be aware they will likely want to drink the whole time you are brewing, because that's how we roll. (Usually.)
Never trust a skinny chef, a sober brewer, or a cat with thumbs!
User avatar
aleguy
 
Posts: 2112
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:36 pm

Postby alms66 » Thu Jun 04, 2009 6:56 pm

These might be useful on the hop front...

http://www.brew365.com/hops_cascade.php
http://www.brew365.com/hops_simcoe.php
http://www.brew365.com/hops_chinook.php

Whenever your kit does come in and you know what hops you've got with it (or are in the hopped extract) you should be able to find those under the 'Articles' section at that same website.
alms66
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:19 pm
Location: New Iberia, LA

Postby clept » Thu Jun 04, 2009 7:48 pm

aleguy wrote:As the "official" club hophead, I feel the need to weigh in here. First off. Save your Simcoe for a 15 minute (Before the end of boil) addition. use your Cascades for dry hopping in the secondary. (2 oz. would be better) and pick up an oz. of Chinook for your 60 minute addition. (Never boil bittering hops for less than an hour.)
This should give you a very drinkable IPA in a few weeks. And yes, add another can of LME or 3lb bag of extra light DME. Try to do a full wort boil if you can. You must have or know someone who has a 7 1/2 gallon stainless turkey fryer pot you can use.
You could always ask a more experienced brewer to come and bring any equipment you don't have. Just be aware they will likely want to drink the whole time you are brewing, because that's how we roll. (Usually.)


Glad to know there are other hop heads down here. Even my beer geek friends aren't into hoppy beers as much as I am, but I'm starting to change that. I've got close ties in San Diego so I stay pretty well stocked with west coast IPA's and DIPA's.

Anyways, back to the brew, I have a 24qt/6 gallon aluminum pot, I was under the assumption that would be big enough for a 5 gallon batch? I've made my fair share of gumbo's so I'm pretty familiar with foam and heat break so I figured I wouldn't have much trouble. Is there something I should know in regards to the size of my pot?

Btw I picked up another can of LME today and will take your advice on the hopping times..
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Postby triple-oh_six » Thu Jun 04, 2009 10:48 pm

A 6 gal pot is just fine for doing 5 gal batches,
there are arguments that aluminum is bad for you, but I've seen just as many say the opposite.
I'm not sure about using the same pot for beer and crawfish though, seems that the cayenne and crab boil would carry over no matter how you clean it.
Not that you said you were using the same pot for both, but in case you are.

Anyway, welcome to the DYS forum, ask any questions you have no matter how noob you think they are.
We were all there once, you can return the favor by helping others later.

Prost,
0006
triple-oh_six
 
Posts: 740
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 1:04 pm
Location: Lafayette,La.

Postby aleguy » Fri Jun 05, 2009 9:59 am

I think a 6-gallon pot is pushing it a little, but good luck. Don't forget you will boil off at least a half gallon in an hour of rolling boil. If you have used your pot for food, you might consider boiling some vinegar and water in it to clean it well. (1 gallon distilled white vinegar to 4-5 gallons water.)
If you get the obsession, you might want to think about one of these:
http://www.kitchensupplydirect.com/002-600.html
Or if you're on a tight budget, one of these:
http://www.kitchensupplydirect.com/370-SPS60.html

Also a wort chiller is definitely in order if you plan to continue brewing. Size it for a 15-gallon pot, because sooner or later you will move up to 10-gallon batches. I know this is way ahead of where you are, just something to think about.
Never trust a skinny chef, a sober brewer, or a cat with thumbs!
User avatar
aleguy
 
Posts: 2112
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:36 pm

Postby clept » Fri Jun 05, 2009 10:31 am

regarding the wort chiller, I see that being one of my first additions when I start buying new parts, any tips or tricks on quick and easy ways to chill the wort aside from carrying the pot across my house to put in a bathtub full of ice water?

Anything I can get at Lowes or Home depot kinda cheapish that will help me out til I buy a proper chiller?
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Postby aleguy » Fri Jun 05, 2009 12:30 pm

You can buy 25 or 50 feet of copper refrigeration line, (3/8" or 1/2") and build an immersion chiller for a lot cheaper than buying one. a couple of hose clamps and a cheap, short hose to cut up and make the ends. Very simple to make, but you will want to borrow some spring tubing benders if you don't have some already, and maybe a 5-gallon keg to wind it around. I suggest you go with 50' because it will work for both five and 10-gallon batches, but 25' is too small to really work for a ten-gallon batch. Your choice.
Other than that, an ice bath is really your only option, but you could do it in a large trash can or one of those big plastic buckets people put drinks and ice in. If you do go with an ice bath, be sure to cover your beer after the temperature falls below 130 degrees to minimize the risk of infection. You don't want to cover it any sooner though, because there are some rather bad tasting volatile compounds being released that you don't want in your beer.
Oh, and if you want to stay with the hobby you can upgrade your immersion chiller with about 12$ worth of fittings to permanently attach hose fittings to your copper coil. They are available from Coburn's plumbing on Ridge road. Just tell them what you want and they'll set you up.
Never trust a skinny chef, a sober brewer, or a cat with thumbs!
User avatar
aleguy
 
Posts: 2112
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:36 pm

Postby clept » Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:32 pm

I'll be going to Lowes later this evening and buying the parts to build my own immersion chiller.. Might as well since I've decided to do a full boil and I'd rather not be walking through my house to the bathtub with a full pot of boiling wort.. Thanks for the info!
clept
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:07 pm

Next

Return to DeadYeast Main Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron