Quaker Oats

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Quaker Oats

Postby alms66 » Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:42 pm

The container says "rolled oats", is this the same as "flaked"? Or simply, can I use it to make beer? :twisted:
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Postby yeastmeister » Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:55 pm

Simply yes.

More complicated....Oats are not necessarily oats, but the one thing they all have in common is that they need to be cooked like you were going to eat them prior to using them in the mash. Cook them up as per recipe, then dump them in the mash. Use rice hulls, lots of them. Beware if your not an all grain brewer. Oats of just about any sort (besides malted oats) turn into a gelatinous mess.

I prefer steel cut oats, basically, I measure them out, put them in some boiling water the night before, cover the pot, and they are ready to use in the mash in the morning. I have used quick oats, and malted oats before. All make a darn good oatmeal stout. Just follow the directions.
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Postby Imakewort » Mon Feb 16, 2009 10:17 pm

From "How to Brew" By John Palmer
12.2 Other Grains and Adjuncts

Oatmeal 1 L Oats are wonderful in a porter or stout. Oatmeal lends a smooth, silky mouthfeel and a creaminess to a stout that must be tasted to be understood. Oats are available whole, steel-cut (i.e. grits), rolled, and flaked. Rolled and flaked oats have had their starches gelatinized (made soluble) by heat and pressure, and are most readily available as "Instant Oatmeal" in the grocery store. Whole oats and "Old Fashioned Rolled Oats" have not had the degree of gelatinization that Instant have had and must be cooked before adding to the mash. "Quick" oatmeal has had a degree of gelatinization but does benefit from being cooked before adding to the mash. Cook according to the directions on the box (but add more water) to ensure that the starches will be fully utilized. Use 0.5-1.5 lb. per 5 gal batch. Oats need to be mashed with barley malt (and its enzymes) for conversion.

Flaked Corn (Maize) Flaked corn is a common adjunct in British bitters and milds and used to be used extensively in American light lager (although today corn grits are more common). Properly used, corn will lighten the color and body of the beer without overpowering the flavor. Use 0.5-2 lb. per 5 gal batch. Corn must be mashed with base malt.

Flaked Barley Flaked unmalted barley is often used in Stouts to provide protein for head retention and body. It can also be used in other strong ale styles. Use 0.5-1 lb. per 5 gal batch. Flaked barley must be mashed with base malt.

Flaked Wheat Unmalted wheat is a common ingredient in wheat beers, including: American Wheat, Bavarian Weisse, and is essential to Belgian Lambic and Wit. It adds starch haze and high levels of protein. Flaked wheat adds more wheat flavor "sharpness" than malted wheat. Use 0.5-2 lb. per 5 gal batch. Must be mashed with base malt.

Flaked Rice Rice is the other principal adjunct used in American and Japanese light lagers. Rice has very little flavor and makes for a drier tasting beer than corn. Use 0.5-2 lb. per 5 gal batch. It must be mashed with base malt.

Oat and Rice Hulls Not an adjunct per se, the hulls of oats and rice are not fermentable, but they can be useful in the mash. The hulls provide bulk and help prevent the mash from settling and becoming stuck during the sparge. This can be very helpful when making wheat or rye beers with a low percentage of barley malt and barley husks. Use 2 - 4 quarts of oat or rice hulls for 6 - 10 lbs. of wheat if doing an all-wheat beer. Rinse thoroughly before using.
http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-2.html
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Postby Mob_Barley » Tue Feb 17, 2009 5:58 am

I use flaked oats, and just add them to the mash with the rest of the grains.
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Postby alms66 » Tue Feb 17, 2009 8:13 am

I've used flaked oats before, and just threw them in the mash, when making an oatmeal stout. Perhaps precooking them would have yielded better results...

Yesterday someone at work gave me a full can of this stuff though, and I knew I had read somewhere that it could be used, I just couldn't find it. Thanks.
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Postby Imakewort » Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:08 am

"Rolled and flaked oats have had their starches gelatinized (made soluble) by heat and pressure, and are most readily available"
With rolled or flaked oats you do not need to do a cereal mash, a good tip is to lightly toast them in your oven at 350 F for about 20 to 45 minutes or till just turning brown. gives the oats a nice flavor and aroma. :D
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Postby aleguy » Tue Feb 17, 2009 12:24 pm

I have always soaked the oats overnight in cold water. Rolled oats don't really need to be cooked. You can do a partial mash in your brew kettle without any barley, but you should add a lot of rice hulls. You will need to add amylase enzymes, available at Marcello's, if you do not have any, or enough, barley malt.

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Postby alms66 » Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:30 pm

Ok, let me rephrase it - that was a question...
They might not need to be cooked, but would you achieve anything by cooking them? Higher efficiency? More mouthfeel?

And while we're on the subject of using oats as an adjunct, I've never seen a 5 gallon recipe with more than 1.5# of oats. Why is that? I've read that a homebrewer could potentially use up to 40% of his grain bill as adjunct - why not oats? Is it just that no brewer in their right mind would want to deal with the resulting mess of using more?
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Postby aleguy » Tue Feb 17, 2009 4:08 pm

Oats form what is commonly referred to as a "glue ball." This is why most people don't use very much in their mash, and why rice hulls are strongly recommended.
I have used an entire box of Quaker oats in a five-gallon batch. I think it's about 3 lbs. I found using the brew-kettle mash system that I simply needed to break up the glue ball three or four times when the mash starts to float. As far as cooking rolled oats, I doubt you would gain much of anything. The starches are already gelatinized and ready to convert. In my opinion, it would only make for a much stickier mess.

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Postby Imakewort » Tue Feb 17, 2009 11:05 pm

lots of good info here (web links below)strait from the pope himself. And I highly recommend listening to each style before brewing it, and also listen to brew strong for advanced topics. these shows combined are almost as good as going to Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan but you do not have to speak German.
http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/Brew-Strong
http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/The-Jamil-Show/Oatmeal-Stout-The-Jamil-Show-02-11-08
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Postby aleguy » Wed Feb 18, 2009 1:24 pm

Everyone has to speak English now by international law.

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