wood-fired burner

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wood-fired burner

Postby aleguy » Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:48 pm

I'm looking to build a wood-fired burner for brewing beer. Part of my personal energy descent plan. Anyway, I'm having trouble finding the information I need. A few years ago, Approvecho published a work entitled "Capturing Heat" which is currently out of print and impossible to find. Does anyone have any Ideas on how I could track this thing down?
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Postby yeastmeister » Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:58 pm

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Postby yeastmeister » Fri Oct 31, 2008 2:08 pm

Still not sure how thats going to lower your carbon footprint.....
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Postby aleguy » Sat Nov 01, 2008 4:49 pm

Carbon footprint deals with fossil carbon. wood is carbon neutral because the co2 produced by burning wood was atmospheric co2 to begin with. it forms a cycle. trees absorb atmospheric carbon then burning releases it, then trees absorb it etc. net zero carbon emissions.
People who sell green tags for tree planting are perpetuating a scam because as soon as the trees die and are burned or rot, thew co2 they absorbed during their lifetimes is released back into the atmosphere. Only corals can truly provide long term carbon sequestration by turning it into lime. As we all know corals are dying off at an unprecedented rate, leaving us with no option but to deal with our own pollution.
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Postby Imakewort » Sun Nov 02, 2008 10:11 pm

if you are really serious about using a green source of energy to help lower your carbon footprint and to boil water for brewing then look at what they use in India, it is very green, your helping the environment by recycling a common waste byproduct, very and I say very very carbon neutral as your using the carbon more than 3 times in it's cycle, and it will import a very distinctive flavor to your beer . needs to be dried so Could be a great hobby to help with all your free time, make farmers happy could also be used to grow mushrooms for sale. Can be used as insulation for your trailer or as a insect repellent if spread on the skin ask a native from Africa. May i say the perfect material for a environmentalist so try BURNING COW DUNG CAKES see link for directions on how to dry dung and make a burner stand for your Dung burner, also to really help the environment you can also dry and burn your own dung that would help with your personal carbon footprint :D :D :D :lol: :lol: :lol:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cowpie
http://www.hedon.info/FuelEfficientCookstovesUsingCowDungCakes[/b]
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Postby Imakewort » Sun Nov 02, 2008 10:32 pm

if you do use it for boiling your wort then you can eliminate your hops altogether for bittering and aroma, saving even more on your carbon footprint. Think of the style of beers you can make umm buffalo chip ale
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Postby yeastmeister » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:25 am

Go solar....zero carbon emmissions...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tt7RG3UR4c
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Postby thebuddrik » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:41 am

How much carbon goes into making a solar panel? :roll:
I like solar but ,to be practical, all it is really good for is charging batteries(unless you have the time to play with all of those mirrors).
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Postby aleguy » Mon Nov 03, 2008 1:15 pm

Okay. Burning dung is most definitely NOT green. It reduces the nutrient value of manure to it's mineral content so you lose all the wonderful organic material that help build healthy soil. Best use would be to ferment the manure along with some carbonaceous waste to produce Methane gas to burn then return the resulting sludge to the fields.
Solar is basically two different technologies. Solar thermal, as the link the Yeastmeister provided is one. Photovoltaic is another. Solar thermal has the highest yield (most efficient) . I built a solar oven for about ten bucks and it works great. A home-scale collector reaching about 650 degrees and using a heat exchanger (Wort Chiller) is entirely doable on the cheap, however that means you can't brew if it's too overcast, and there are a lot of days around here that have very heavy cloud cover.
Photovoltaics are effective for charging batteries, but the current can also be used directly. For people who don't want batteries, they simply hook their solar panels directly to the grid and use that as a storage battery. Power in during the day, power out at night. The carbon footprint for the creation of PV panels varies considerably. Evergreen Solar uses strictly solar energy to create their panels using mostly recycled silicon so their carbon footprint is near zero. All PVs generate as much power as was used to make them (energy payback) in an average of about two years. The better ones come with a 25-year warranty, and can be expected to produce electricity for at least 50 years, but 70 -100 seems more likely. Nobody really knows how long they will produce power for since they've only been around since the 1950s and none of them has worn out yet.
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Postby Imakewort » Mon Nov 03, 2008 2:04 pm

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Forget about wind or solar Cow dung is the most enviromental friendly
instead of just drying and burning cow dung you could make a biogas plant
How? Dung is mixed by hand with water and fed into an underground ‘digesting plant’. The bacteria that come with dung from the cow’s stomach breaks down the waste in the underground ‘air-tight’ digester. In the absence of oxygen, the mixing of the cow dung with water leads to a reaction that produces a gas comprising up to 70% methane and the remainder CO2.16 The digested slurry flows to an outlet tank and ends up in the compost pit, while the gas is tapped from the top of the plant’s dome with a pipe that ends in the burner of the kitchen stove.17
A calculation is quoted stating that the new biogas “generated from cattle dung in rural Nepal has lit around 140,000 domestic fires, saving 400,000 tonnes of firewood, 800,000 litres of kerosene and preventing 600,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases from escaping into the atmosphere.â€￾see link to learn how to build your own
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM9SZyPpm-I
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Postby aleguy » Mon Nov 03, 2008 5:28 pm

You clearly didn't read my post. Manure doesn't "react"with water to make methane any more than grain "reacts"with water to make beer. It's a fermentation process and some bacteria are more efficient than others at conversion. It's not any more green than a wood-fired burner. It's far less green actually, because if you use straight manure, the sludge left over is high in nitrogen and will burn out the soil life on the fields and leach nitrates into the groundwater and eventually the local aquifer.
By the way, the co2 can be scrubbed out using the same technology submarines use. It's a simple chemical reaction that uses abundant natural minerals and is reversible using heat. (Solar furnace?) The resulting biogas is equal in quality to fossil "Natural gas."
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Postby Imakewort » Mon Nov 03, 2008 8:48 pm

my post is a direct cut and paste from the website that promotes using dung. the bacteria found in the cows stomach converts the dung to methane, look at the video link, this is the main source of fuel for cooking promoted by environmental groups to be used in 3rd world countries, the link will show you how to do it.
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Postby Imakewort » Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:01 pm

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
for you to cut back on carbon emissions to save the earth is a waste of time, just for you I ground ran a couple of aircraft tonight for no reason but to help you. I ran them at 100% 35% torque for 10 minutes each to more than make up any carbon offsets you could ever accomplish. you are now in the hole for about 10 years. there is no way to offset this. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D and next week I will do it again so your set for life feel free to use propane you can never burn enough propane to equal what i did just for you, your welcome :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: brew baby brew :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink:
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Postby aleguy » Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:08 pm

Igor, you seem to have dung on the brain. I believe that officially makes you a shit head.
Besides it's not about cutting my carbon footprint. it's about Hubbert's peak.
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Postby Imakewort » Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:33 pm

Cambridge Energy Research Associates authored a report that is critical of Hubbert influenced predictions:
“ Despite his valuable contribution, M. King Hubbert's methodology falls down because it does not consider likely resource growth, application of new technology, basic commercial factors, or the impact of geopolitics on production. His approach does not work in all cases-including on the United States itself-and cannot reliably model a global production outlook. Put more simply, the case for the imminent peak is flawed. As it is, production in 2005 in the Lower 48 in the United States was 66 percent higher than Hubbert projected.
so if your serious about looking for a alternative fuel you need to think out side the box, and come up with a totally renewable source of energy. and if you want to be green about it there are some pretty good models to follow being used in India.
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